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  • 33

Passenger carries firearm through TSA screening at Atlanta onto Delta flight

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A traveler carrying a firearm boarded a flight from Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and flew to Tokyo Narita International Airport on January 3, according to a statement from the Transportation Security Administration. "TSA has determined standard procedures were not followed and a passenger did in fact pass through a standard screening TSA checkpoint with a firearm at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on the morning of January 3," the release states. (www.cnn.com) 更多...

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jimquinndallas
Jim Quinn 7
Immediately after 9/11 when it was announced that 45,000 TSA agent would be hired, I considered it to be a huge government employment program and not much else. It was a "feel good" move for the public. Previously many people thought that the screeners were already public employees however the airlines hired screening agencies for the job and, of course, these agencies were usually the lowest bidders. Since then I've read numerous accounts of TSA failures to detect weapons and explosives and wondered if it was just a small percentage of millions of passengers that slipped by or that there was a tremendous failure in training TSA personnel, a lack of supervision, attitude or morale problems, etc. At one time I advocated that concealed carrier licensed citizens and former law enforcement persons be able to take advanced federal training and be allowed to supplement the air marshal efforts by being allowed to bring their weapons on board. Frankly I'm not sure if that would have been a good idea, but I think it would have been worth some research. It has been said that the TSA has to be good 100% of the time but the bad guys only have to be successful once. I just don't know what the solution may be. Whatever it is, apparently what we have now isn't working.
outward
Somebody's in biiiiig trouble. I am really surprised this happened, considering all the searches and pat downs the TSA does. It's amazing that with all the security measures in place this happened. I imagine there's going to be a big shake up in that particular area of TSA at Atlanta airport and that several people might find themselves standing in the unemployment line.
BSJ
TSA almost never finds firearms and explosives, that are planted by TSA agents to test their own screeners. TSA is a sham!
bbabis
Bill Babis 4
True, but they have one hell of a water, toothpaste, and shampoo stock.
OccamsRazor
Ben Bosley 0
Possible human factors influence. Difficult to focus on your job when you don't know when your next paycheck is coming and bills are piling up.
aknorris
aknorris 3
The TSA apparently disagrees with this idea, based on this quote directly from the article:

"The perception that this might have occurred as a result of the partial government shutdown would be false," TSA said. "The national unscheduled absence rate of TSA staff on Thursday, January 3, 2019, was 4.8% compared to 6.3% last year, Thursday, January 4, 2018. So in fact, the national call out rate was higher a year ago than this year on that date.""
bbabis
Bill Babis 5
Since these posts are monitored by government officials, I'll suffice it to say that this does happen more often than reported. The amazing thing is that these guns do not go onto sneak out of hiding and hijack aircraft on their own.
ADXbear
ADXbear 4
I smell i political rat in this story,, it was more about the shutdown than the ho
w the gun got through.. I call BS.
sstuff
sstuff 1
On my original reading, I did not note the story's source. But when I saw ADXbear's "political rat comment . . . well, there you go.
Highflyer1950
Highflyer1950 3
300,000,000 guns in America.....it was bound to happen as the law of averages dictate. If I read the article correctly the passenger self reported the incident? 2nd amendment quoters don’t jump all over this but, the bar is set very low for gun ownership, open/concealed carrry permits, level of competency and specific gun knowledge! However, the IQ levels, common sense thinking and reaction to real or perceived threats vary as much as the opinions on this forum. From the 2 year old that pulls mommy’s gun from her purse and shoots her dead to the mass murderer in Las Vegas to the guy who walks into the local tire store with a .45 on his hip as if it were some kind of Macho status symbol.
mldavis2
Mike Davis 3
Just a quick comment: the report states it was learned by "customer disclosure." The question here is whether or not a firearm really was carried through, or did a customer with an alternate agenda (perhaps) report it when it didn't happen? Another thought is whether or not it might have been a plastic 3D printer made weapon with insufficient metal to alert a screening device or x-ray.
KenWD0ELQ
Ken Mitchell -3
The solution is to privatize airport security, and make them responsible to the airlines or airports. The TSA generally DOESN'T detect firearms or "suspicious" packages, and has never once caught an actual terrorist.
jimquinndallas
Jim Quinn 4
Hi, Ken. They already had privatized airport security before 9/11 and those firms were worse, unfortunately.
TaylorBeck
Taylor Beck 4
Israel has the answer for airport security. Our leaders are too weak to implement it.
scott8733
scott8733 0
It's a great thought, but there are 2 primary issues with implementation- first, our aviation network is far more vast (Israel's population is roughly the same as Ohio). Second, the system profiles pax - imagine the ACLU sinking their teeth into that.

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