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Rusty pilots admit they are making mistakes because of a lack of flying time

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Airline pilots are making mistakes because they have become rusty because of the lack of flying time during the coronavirus pandemic. Dozens of pilots have told NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System that they have made errors since getting back into the cockpit. On one occasion a pilot forgot to disengage the parking brake when pulling away from the gate. (www.yahoo.com) 更多...

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canuck44
canuck44 7
Interesting. Delta seems to be keeping some of their wide body pilots current as they are using 767-400 to RSW from Detroit and MSP. Those are normally single aisle equipment.
Highflyer1950
Highflyer1950 12
Rough landings I can deal with, forgetting a checklist item not so much?

jmanley20
John Manley 4
it happens more than you would think
darjr26
darjr26 5
The airlines are in a very difficult situation. When they cut back flying and retire fleet types it creates a domino affect that has a major impact on their pilots. When an airline decides to retire say all of their 767s and 757s, all the pilots that flew those aircraft need to bid and train on another fleet type. When an early retirement package is offered sometimes hundreds of senior pilots take it, opening seats on wide bodies that fly internationally. So a senior 737 captain might bid to a 777 and start flying to India instead of Indiana. It’s pretty common on international trips for the Captain to make only 1 or 2 landings per trip. With cut backs in flying they may only get one trip a month and to remain current they only need to make 3 landings every 90 days. Cut backs have a snowballing affect that involves every fleet type and every seat. I think its a tribute to the pilots,of all the airlines, that have kept the system as safe as it has been.
wcraycroft
Warren Craycroft 4
Skipping a checklist is not a "mistake". It is hazardous risk-taking with potentially catastrophic consequences. Northwest Flight 255, with a combined 29,000 hours in the cockpit, still haunts me.
mam361
When I learned to fly I would sometimes go weeks between flights. My instructor drilled into me the use of checklists ... always. It's a good habit to get into, even for a seasoned pilot who may have just flown two legs. I would take my Piper to two or three different airports and follow the checklist religiously every segment of every flight.
glwood2
glwood2 2
There is a reason for the 2 pilot requirement (sometimes, rarely, even 3).
jmanley20
John Manley 2
so much for keeping ASAPs confidential.... this is completely counter intuitive to fear the public for no good reason. Professional Aviators are believe it or not HUMAN and therefore prone to making mistakes. This is why we have ASAP in the first place to ensure we uphold a positive culture of safety. just saying...
mhawke1
Michael Hawke 9
The ASRS system had never been totally hidden from public. Anyone can access and search it to promote learning. The entries are anonymous. I think most people would rather know that the pilots recognize their errors in order to correct them rather then ignoring them to save face. We (the public) depend on the two pilots backing each other up and using checklists
mam361
I agree. I used to read "I learned about flying from" when I was younger. Still love to watch the "Mayday, Crash Investigations." It's not about scaring the public, it's about educating. This article is read by mostly aviators (I would assume)... not the general public.
MickLucas
William Lucas 1
And here is me thinking that all pilots had to have regular refreshers on simulators in order to keep their licences. That's why Ansett had a simulator for each type of aircraft they flew, and pilots had to keep up to date on them to keep flying.
rs0
Raphael Sampaio 0
I have the solution for that. It's called a flight simulator, available on Steam for 60 bucks.
MickLucas
William Lucas 1
That may be ok for playing games, but no good for real life training.
craigbell1941
craigbell1941 0
Flying an airplane is an exhaustible skill.
mohawk5
Dolores Allee 0
my son left the air force after flying as a flight engineer on KC-10 air flight refueling and C-140 for 24 years..I would fly with him any day at the controls ! I'm not criticising pilot's, but if that is your profession ? you need to be on top of your game everytime you enter that cockpit ! what scares me the most is younger pilots with a minimum of 1500 flying hours to fly ? Will miss all the seasoned pilots who are at their retirement age ! As a pilot said to me on a layover, "after 10 feet on take off, everyone is a passenger. " I just wanted to say...keep the skies safe and for all those who fly...
DCKOZAK
Donald Kozak 1
Every pilot who has 10,000+ hours flying professionally had 1500 hours at some point of their life. We all age out and that experience heads west at some point. Younger pilots, like younger drivers, will develop better stills though repetition and proper mentoring as they age. Maturity, or better the lack there of, is the bane of the youth. Always was, always will be. Thank senior pilots for their time and their mentoring. The youth will do just fine, they always do . Anyway, what's the option?
patt46
paul patten 1
A pilot with 1500 hours at the controls has more piloting experience than a person with 24 years at at the panel.
Propwash122
Peter Fuller -8
Reports like this just unnecessarily alarm the nervous flying public, and could erode pilot trust in confidentiality of ASRS reports. To report a mistake through ASRS you’d first need to recognize the mistake, and then you’d correct the mistake. I’d worry more about mistakes that aren’t noticed.

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