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The Silent Anniversary. Fifteen Years (and Counting).

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Now in Ask the Pilot: The Silent Anniversary. Fifteen Years Since Our Last Major Crash. This isn't a minor story. On the contrary, it's one of the most significant milestones in U.S. aviation history. (www.askthepilot.com) 更多...

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MultiComm
MultiComm 7
Wonder if this was written by a pilot of a major carrier? The following quote is deheartening. I work for a regional and the culture and levels of professionalism as well as focus on safety and CRM/TEM is top notch! Maybe it didn't used to be this way prior to the 1500 hour rule but it is embarrassing that we still try to classify a regional carrier as a separate reporting statistic and claim the majors set the standards. Different operational environments is very true but if anything that should give even more a reason to include them in such a statistic as the risk factors increase when you have regional carriers doing much more demanding and rigorous flying of the US system ... often flying 5-6 legs a day!.

"Regional carriers, for instance, can have substantially different cultural and operational environments than their legacy carrier affiliates. It’s the majors that set the standard, and it’s only fair that we measure from there."
RonBurgundy
I feel just as safe on Republic & Skywest as I do on American & Southwest. They are all safe airlines, and as a result, I'd ahve to say all have placed safety & training first and foremost. You cannot transport millions of people without casualty and say that safety isn't top notch...you just can't.

I'd like to add that the majors have had incidents and accidents over the last decade or so that could have ended in tragedy.

Among others, these include:

American flight 1400 out of STL (2007). Read the report, and you'll find that the pilots had trouble keeping altitude after an engine failure. This is over the busy St. Louis metro area.

Delta 1086 LaGuardia (2015). A few more yards and that plane would've been in cold, dark, icy waters. Many may have drowned (think of the USAir Fokker crash years ago).

Delta 2845 & Southwest 4013 (and others) landed at the wrong airport(s)! Even a crash with a light piston aircraft could have resulted in deadly, non-survivable fires.

Alaska 27 in Seattle landed on the taxiway. See problems from above.

Runway incursions and near misses exist, as well. Just browse "AvHerald," and you'll be surprised at the close-calls.

Yes, it's been a wonderful 15 years for the majors, and let's hope it stays that way. I believe it to be statistically significant, yet I believe sheer luck is also involved.

Thank you.
ColinSeftel
The harder you practise, the luckier you get.
bbabis
bbabis 6
It would be easy to pat ourselves on the back and say, yea! But then it doesn't take much thought to see what is really happening. The sentence about midway thru the article, "We’ve engineered away what used to be the most common causes of accidents.", hits the nail on the head. The overriding cause of accidents is human error and as humans are removed more and more from systems/flight management the accident rate will go down. Yes, us mortals can still save the day when the electrons glitch or birds fly through the engines but more often than not flyable airplanes come to grief.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
Yeah, but if the fact that MH squawks at least a dozen failures a week that have a successful outcome with any Boeing going somewhere, the pilots must be doing something right.
BurntOut
BurntOut 0
What about Air France 447? Or are only talking about metal hitting metal (CTIA)?
ColinSeftel
The article states that there has not been a large-scale, multiple-fatality disaster involving a U.S. major for 15 years. Air France doesn't count as a US airline!

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